Browse Category: AKG

AKG D5 Vs SM58 Comparison

Shure SM58 has become the go-to choice of many people for live vocals. There are good reasons. The microphone is certainly a good-quality one. It is simple to use while offering good sound quality. However, people who have met AKG D5 say that this mic is even better. So, how do AKG D5 vs SM58 compare?

Continue reading below to find out more about:
– The designs and features of AKG D5 and Shure SM58,
– The comparisons of the sound quality of the two mics,
– The distinctive advantages of each mic, and
– Which mic that is more recommended for the money.

Design and Build Quality
AKG D5 is a stylish microphone. It does not look like a typical conventional microphone. It features a black grill and body along with a large AKG logo. The shape is quite elegant. Regarding the build quality, AKG D5 is also very good. The housing feels truly solid and rugged. This mic is certainly ready to be brought along in trips and travels. See also: Neumann TLM 102 vs AKG C414.

Shure SM58 is also a rugged and durable microphone, but the design is very conventional. It simply features a spherical metallic grille and a black body. Well, it just looks exactly like many other mics. The Shure brand is written near the base of the grille. Nevertheless, the look of the mic is indeed not the most important factor; as long as it works and is durable enough, it is great.

Technical Specs

AKG D5AKG SM58
- Polar Pattern : Supercardioid- Polar Pattern : Cardioid
- Audio frequency bandwidth : 70 - 20000 Hz- Frequency Response : 50 to 15,000 Hz
- Sensitivity : 2.6 mV/Pa- Sensitivity : (at 1,000 Hz Open Circuit Voltage) : -54.5 dBV/Pa (1.85 mV) 1 Pa = 94 dB SPL

Polar Pattern
When choosing between AKG D5 vs SM58, note that they come with different polar patterns. AKG says that the D5 is a supercardioid mic. On the other hand, Shure SM58 is a cardioid mic. The different polar patterns may provide the most benefits for different cases.

As a supercardioid mic, AKG D5 has a considerably narrower pickup angle on the front. As the effect, it is much more resistant to environmental noise, especially against sound signals coming from the sides. This is a big advantage when there are other performers on the stage, such as the instruments. However, this polar pattern may capture some noise from the back, so make sure to give enough space between the singer and the audience to avoid picking such noise.

Shure SM58 is a cardioid mic. This polar pattern is perhaps the most familiar one to us. A cardioid mic primarily picks up sound signals from the front while rejecting the sides and rear. It has a wider pickup angle than supercardioid. So, it is relatively more prone to noise coming from the sides.

Sound Quality
Of course, both mics sound great. However, AKG D5 has slightly more high-end content, whereas Shure SM58’s high-end content tends to be somewhat rolled off. Furthermore, AKG D5 also has slightly lower bass. This is easily noticeable when the mic pops on a breath sound. Hence, it is a good choice for bass amps or bass vocals. Shure SM58 doesn’t reach as low. Both mics have decent clarity, as they are capable of delivering sharp, detailed sounds.

AKG D5 Vs SM58

- Rugged construction
- Handheld dynamic vocal microphone designed for lead and backing vocals
- Patented AKG laminated varimotion diaphragm
- Super-cardioid polar pattern for high gain before Feedback
- Frequency response tailored for vocals, with brightened midrange and bass rolloff to control proximity effect
- Effective built-in spherical wind and pop filter. Frequency response: 50 to 15,000 Hz
- Pneumatic shock-mount system cuts down handling noise.
- Uniform cardioid pickup pattern isolates the main sound source and minimizes background noise

Conclusion
Between the two mics, we recommend you to choose AKG D5. This mic has a stylish design, and the supercardioid polar pattern is handy for reducing environmental noise from the sides. The sound has better high-end content and bass reach.

Neumann TLM 102 Vs AKG C414 Comparison

Neumann TLM 102 serves as an affordable model suitable for people looking for an entry-level Neumann mic. It is considered by many as a good product to introduce people to the superior quality of Neumann mics. On the other hand, AKG C414 is a more expensive condenser mic, but the features and capabilities are very interesting. Which one should you get? Read the comparisons of Neumann TLM 102 vs AKG C414 below for the answer.

Neumann TLM 102 Vs AKG C414

Design
Neumann TLM 102 comes with a compact yet durable construction, however it doesn’t lose the distinctive Neumann design character. It has a length of about 116 mm and a diameter of 52 mm. It is very lightweight at about 210 grams. It is a large-diaphragm microphone with a pressure gradient transducer, featuring a transformerless circuitry. See also our previous post about Neumann TLM 102 vs U87 here!

On the other hand, AKG C414 is slightly bigger and heavier. It measures 160 mm long, 50 mm wide, and 38 mm thick. The weight is about 300 grams. It looks very stylish and professional with the dark gray and gold finish. On the front side, you can see an LED indicator which is to warn about an overload or audio peak. The construction is sturdy and rugged.

Technical Specs

Blue SparkBlue Yeti
- Transducer Type : Condenser, Pressure Gradient- Capsules : condenser, pressure gradient
- Polar Patterns : Cardioid- Polar Patterns : cardioid, bidirectional, omnidirectional, stereo
- Frequency Response : 20Hz – 20kHz- Frequency Response : 20Hz - 20kHz
- Max SPL : 136 dB SPL (1k, THD 0.5%)- Max SPL : 120dB (THD: 0.5% 1kHz)

Polar Pattern
One of the biggest differences between Neumann TLM 102 vs AKG C414 is the polar pattern. Neumann TLM 102 only has a single polar pattern, which is cardioid. This polar pattern is suitable for most recording purposes, as it captures audio signals from a single direction while rejecting the rest.

However, AKG C414 offers a greater range of versatility and adaptability. It has nine selectable polar patterns for the best setting for every need. The polar patterns include cardioid, wide cardioid, hypercardioid, figure eight, and omnidirectional. So, you can choose the most suitable polar patterns for different vocals, instruments, and conditions.

Features
Neumann TLM 102 has a high maximum SPL handling by default. It can handle voices as loud as 144 dB, which is good enough for most singers and instruments except the very loud ones. In addition, it has a very low self noise level, which is only 12 dBA. It uses an XLR3F connector.

On the other hand, AKG C414 has a default maximum SPL handling of 140 dB. However, it is also equipped with a selectable pre-attenuation pad which can be set to -6dB, -12dB, or -18dB. So, you can have a maximum SPL handling of 158 dB with this mic, which is high enough for most loud singers and instruments.

In addition, AKG C414 also features a selectable bass-cut filter which attenuates the frequencies under 160 Hz, 80 Hz, or 40 Hz. This is useful for reducing wind and handling noise. It has a very low self noise level of just 6 dBA.

Sound Quality
Both of these two mics have excellent sound quality. They both have a frequency response range of 20 Hz – 20 kHz.Neumann TLM 102 tends to be brighter due to the slight presence boost above 6 kHz. Meanwhile, AKG C414 is also somewhat bright; it has a soaring sound that is the typical of condenser microphones.

Neumann TLM 102 Vs AKG C414

- Large-diaphragm microphone with cardioid directional characteristic (pressure gradient transducer)
- Compact Neumann design
- Very high maximum sound pressure level (144 dB)
- Slight presence boost above 6 kHz helps vocals to shine in the mix
- Sonic character of the famous AKG C12 delivers astounding sound quality for lead vocals and solo instruments
- Nine selectable polar patterns for the perfect setting for every application
- Three attenuation levels (-6/-12/-18dB) for close-up recording or high-output sources of up to 158dB SPL
- Three switchable different bass-cut filters to reduce wind noise, stage vibration or proximity effect

Conclusion
In general, AKG C414 makes the better choice. It offers a great value for the money. It is a lot more versatile with the features and capabilities.

Rode M5 Vs AKG P170 Comparison

Rode M5 and AKG P170 are two models of pencil microphones often deployed for choirs and instruments. They are available in a similar price range, and they do share a number of similarities such as the frequency response range, polar pattern, and self noise level. Still, there are a few differences that set Rode M5 vs AKG P170 apart. Continue reading below to see whether Rode M5 or AKG P170 suits you!

Rode M5 Vs AKG P170

Size and Weight
Rode M5 is smaller and lighter than AKG P170. Rode M5 measures 20 mm in diameter and 100 mm in length. The weight is approximately 80 grams. In most cases, the mic is practical and easy to handle. You can get a pair of Rode M5 in a bundle that also includes the mic clips and pop filters. See our previous post about Rode M5 vs NT5 here!

On the other hand, AKG P170 is a little bit bigger and heavier. It has a diameter of 22 mm, a length of 160 mm, and a weight of about 130 grams. The mic is sold in a package that also includes a stand adapter. Both Rode M5 and AKG P170 have all-metal bodies for the best ruggedness and durability.

Technical Specs

Rode M5AKG P170
- Polar Pattern: Cardioid- Polar Pattern : Cardioid
- Frequency Range: 20Hz - 20kHz- Frequency Response : 20Hz-20kHz
- Output Impedance : 200 ohm- Output Impedance : 200 ohms
- Acoustic Principle: Pressure Gradient- Microphone Type : Condenser
- Capsule : 0.50"- Mono/Stereo : Mono

Features
Rode M5 is a little more versatile in term of powering because it can work with either +24V or +48V phantom power. On the other hand, AKG P170can only work with +48V phantom power with ±4V tolerance.

Both mics have the cardioid polar pattern. A mic with a cardioid polar pattern captures sound signals from the front direction while rejecting signals from the sides and rear. Because of this, cardioid mics are suitable for musical recordings. They are more resistant to environmental noise.

Rode M5 has a good maximum SPL handling of 140 dB. This mic is good enough for handling most instruments and vocals except the very loud ones.

On the other hand, although AKG P170 only has a maximum SPL handling of 135 dB, it comes with a –20dB switchable pre-attenuation pad which enables it to handle sounds as loud as 155 dB. Hence, it is a good choice when you need to handle a very loud vocal or instrument.

Sound Quality
Rode M5 vs AKG P170 have similar sound quality, which is not entirely surprising due to the fact that they have similar frequency response range and self noise level. Each of them has a frequency response range of 20 Hz – 20 kHz and a self noise level of 19 dBA. They are able to capture lows, mids, and highs with decent accuracy and definition. They have pretty good clarity.

Rode M5 does have a slightly higher sensitivity, which makes it able to capture more audio details. However, this also means that it is more prone to noise – the pop filters can be quite handy. On the other hand, AKG P170 has a slightly lower sensitivity, but the performance is still good.

Rode M5 Vs AKG P170

- Power Options: +48V phantom power, +24V phantom power
- Warranty: 1 year with free extension to 10 years following registration
- Rugged all-metal body and robust design withstands tough day-to-day use
- Switchable attenuation pad for high SPL applications up to 155 dB SPL

Conclusion
Between the two mics, AKG P170 is more recommended. The pre-attenuation pad makes the mic more versatile. You can use it for handling a wide variety of instruments, including the louder ones.

AKG D112 Vs Shure Beta 52A Comparison

To record a kick, you can use the microphone like AKG D112 and Shure Beta 52A. The location of the microphone very influential towards the sound that is produced, thus frequently experimented with set distance on the mic with the source of the sound. A great mic selection is very influential to the sound of pounding drums to be generated. Among AKG D112 and Shure Beta 52A mic, which becomes your favorite mic? Surely after read this article first.

AKG D112 vs Shure Beta 52A

AKG D112
The AKG D112 Kick Drum Mic is usually being used on stage or in the studio, the microphone is also using to clean up the dirty low down on the drum. The microphone stays free of distortion even at high sound pressure levels, is a solid and powerful response below 100Hz, and a very low diaphragm resonance, also plus great narrow-band rising high-frequency response at 4kHz, and extremely robust construction are other outstanding features. This mic works great for bass cabs, trombone, and other low-frequency instruments.Below are the features that included inside the mic: Handles up to 168db SPL with no audible distortion, low diaphragm resonance, and extremely robust construction. If you are worry about the broken one day, it also has 2-year parts and labor warranty. (Have a look : Audix D6 Vs AKG D112 Comparison)

Technical Specs

AKG D112Shure Beta 52A
- Polar Pattern : Cardioid- Polar Pattern: Supercardioid
- Audio frequency bandwidth : 20 to 17000 Hz- Output Level (at 1,000 Hz): Open Circuit Voltage: -64 dBV/Pa* (0.6 mV)*1 Pa = 94 dB SPL
- Recommended load impedance : 2000 Ohms- Impedance : Rated impedance is 150 ohms (45 ohms actual)

Shure Beta 52A
Shure Beta 52A has the great features like Frequency response shaped are special made only for kick drums and bass instruments, a built-in dynamic locking stand adapter with integral XLR connector with easy setup inside a kick drum, studio-quality performance until for high sound-pressure levels, supercardioid pattern & superior rejection of unwanted noise, and hardened steel mesh grille resists wear and abuse, and other functionality features. The Shure Beta 52A Kick Drum Mic is a kind of high-output and dynamic microphone which comes with a frequency response tailored specifically for kick drums and other bass instruments. You will be provided by superb attack and punch. They can deliver studio-quality sound even at extremely high SPLs. The modified supercardioid pattern ensures high gain-before-feedback and excellent rejection of unwanted sound. You can see also Audix D6 Vs Shure Beta 52A Comparison.

AKG D112 Vs Shure Beta 52A

- Large-diaphragm dynamic microphone for bass instruments
- Extremely high SPL capability
- Classic microphone for stage and studio applications
- Studio quality performance, even a high sound pressure levels
- Low sensitivity to varying load impedance
- Frequency response shaped specifically for kick drums and bass instruments

Conclusion
If in personally, we prefer and recommend you to choose the Beta 52A over the AKG D112 just because the IMHO the 52 gives you more to work with and just that straight up rock and roll thump. For a heavy metal or a hardcore than the AKG D112 is better suited for that type of music. All is depending upon where you bought it if you do not like the AKG D112 as your mic then you can probably go back and exchange for the Beta 52. We are considering most people are not going to use either one as a vocal mic.

AKG C414 Vs Neumann TLM 103 Comparison

Microphone device is part of the sound system is pretty vital. Microphone consists of the type of use such as for vocals and also for percusion. There’s also the mic clip on which we can use for presentation purposes or used for the broadcaster. But this time the review discusses mic type a more versatile and luxurious. MY AKG C414 and Neumann TLM 103 two particular brands know superiorly but also with facilities and features that they provide. How RDA C414 against Neumann TLM 103, or vice versa?

AKG C414 Vs Neumann TLM 103

AKG C414
The list of features in AKG C414 are Sonic character of the famous AKG C12, Nine selectable polar patterns, Three attenuation levels (-6,-12,-18dB), Three switchable different bass-cut filters, and Overload warning with audio peak hold LED. The AKG C 414 XL II condenser microphone is the successor to the famous AKG C 414 B-TL II mic. The AKG C 414 XL II mic is a unique sonic signature of the highly sought showed by AKG. It enables lead vocals and solo instruments to be placed even in a dense mix. The sound produces unrivaled up-front that is well-known for distant miking applications like classic music recording or drum ambiance miking. The AKG C 414 also offers nine pickup patterns for you to choose the perfect setting for every application. If you want to see the live-sound applications and permanent installations, all controls can be disabled easily enabling trouble-free use. (See also : AKG C414 Vs Neumann U87 Comparison)

Technical Specs

AKG C414Neumann TLM 103
- Polar Pattern : Omni, Wide Cardioid, Cardioid, Hypercardioid, Figure-8- Directional pattern : Cardioid
- Frequency Response : 20Hz-20kHz- Frequency range : 20 Hz - 20 kHz
- Output Impedance : 200 ohms- Rated impedance : 50 ohms
- Equivalent noise level : 7 dB-A- Signal to Noise Ratio : 88dB (A weighted)

Neumann TLM 103
The Neumann TLM 103 is known as a universal cardioid mic. The words of cardioid refers to the directional pattern of the mic and the “heart-shaped” pattern that accepts sounds from the front and then rejects them at the back too. There are no switches at all in this mic TLM 103, so you can not switch it into omni mode as you want where it picks up from all sides. There is also no pad to lower the sensitivity of the mic. It is also a limitation on paper, although we know in reality it is not. The mic can handle a high SPL with a maximum of 138db and it does so with extremely low self noise and seems to resist overload. The Neumann TLM 103 is also known as a large diaphragm condenser mic which handle most recording situations one will come up against. It shines as a vocal mic with pleasing coloration in the high frequency realm. It has proximity effect is nearly perfect and absolutely gives you that extra bass you want without being overbearing. (Take a look : Neumann U87 Vs TLM 103 Comparison)

AKG C414 Vs Neumann TLM 103

- Nine selectable polar patterns for the perfect setting for every application
- Sonic character of the famous AKG C12 delivers astounding sound quality for lead vocals and solo instruments
- Three attenuation levels (-6/-12/-18dB) for close-up recording or high-output sources of up to 158dB SPL
- Delivery includes an SG 103 swivel mount and a wooden jeweler's box
- A standard name in high-end recording studios around the world, Neumann mics deliver the professional touch that's needed to capture high-quality audio
- The TLM 103 is fast becoming a standard for home recording and the music industry

Conclusion
Both AKG C414 and Neumann TLM 103 are amazing mics. The AKG 414 will probably give you more flexibility because of the variable polar patterns, pad, and other features. But the sound in Neumann with the Neumann that you try to tend to equate with more meat. While, the AKG 414 tends to sound more “airy” which can be good or bad thing depending on you all. In other words, both have their strengths and weaknesses. You may become the judge based on sound.

Lewitt LCT 640 Vs AKG C414 XLS Comparison

In the music industry, the microphone is one of the very important tools for live performance or recording. The reason why there should be a “way” to select it is because of the many different types and brands of microphone on the market that make us confused to choose which. Random bought microphone, though with it’s cheap though it is just a waste of money because the function obtained. Maybe two Microphone which we will review a little about each of them will be one of your preferred microphone for later use as one of the tools that support any of the industry that you are living. What are the types? There are Lewitt LCT 640 and AKG C414 XLS. Here, we will make versus here they are: Lewitt LCT 640 Vs AKG C414 XLS.

Lewitt LCT 640 Vs AKG C414 XLS

Lewit LCT 640
Lewitt LCT640 has a ribbon shape of microphone. It also has dual-diaphragm and one-inch capasitor capsule. There are five pattern of this mic such as omni, figure-of-eight and three widths of cardioid. The dynamic range is 145dB with a creditably low self-noise specification of 10 to 13 dB EIN. The Sensitivity is quoted as 13mV/Pa in cardioid mode, falling to 9mV/Pa in the figure-of-eight setting. The mainly frequencies above 5kHz and the output is on a three-pin XLR with gold-plated pins, and standard 48V phantom power is required for operation. The latter introduces either 0dB, 6dB, 12dB or 18dB of pre-attenuation, while the low-cut filter can impose a 12dB/octave roll-off at 40Hz, or gentler 6dB/octave cuts at 150Hz or 300Hz.

Technical Specs

Lewitt LCT 640AKG C414 XLS
- Frequency range : 20 - 20.000Hz- Audio Frequency bandwidth 20 to 20000 Hz
- Sensitivity : 13 mV / Pa (-38 dBV- Sensitivity 23 mV/Pa
- Equivalent noise level : 10 dB-A- Equivalent Noise Level 6 dB-A
- Signal / noise ratio : 84dB-A- Signal to Noise 88 dB-A

AKG C414 XLS
The AKG C414 XLS is a multipattern condenser microphone with nine polar patterns for the perfect sonic capture for every application. The AKG C414 XLS is featured with Omni, wide cardioid, cardioid, hypercardioid, figure eight, and four intermediate pickup patterns, Engineered for highest linearity and neutral sound for beautifully detailed recording of vocals and any acoustic instrument, Nine selectable polar patterns for the perfect setting for every application, Three attenuation levels (-6,-12,-18dB) for close-up recording or high-output sources of up to 158dB SPL, Three different switchable bass-cut filters, and overload warning with audio peak hold LED to detect shortest audio peaks.

Lewitt LCT 640 Vs AKG C414 XLS

- Superior transient response from ultra-thin externally biased, gold-layered low-mass diaphragms for ear-catching realism and authentic sound
- 5 directional characteristics for maximum flexibility in a wide variety of recording applications
- 10 dB self-noise and max SPL of 145 dB for a total dynamic range of 135 dB, providing maximum acoustic presence and clarity
- 4-position switchable pre-attenuation pad (0 dB, 6 dB, 12 dB and 18 dB) for handling extremely high sound pressure levels and 4-position high-pass filter
- Flat frequency response for natural, authentic sound
- Engineered for highest linearity and neutral sound for beautifully detailed recording of vocals and any acoustic instrument
- Nine selectable polar patterns for the perfect setting for every application
- Three attenuation levels (-6/-12/-18dB) for close-up recording or high-output sources of up to 158dB SPL
- Three different switchable bass-cut filters to reduce wind noise, subsonic noise or proximity effect
- Overload warning with audio peak hold LED to detect shortest audio peaks

Conclusion
Finally we arrive at the conclusion of Lewitt LCT 640 vs AKG C414 XLS comparison and battle review. We think that you will love AKG C414 XLS better thatn Lewitt LCT 640 to death but, in case if you want to stretch your budget as far as it can go and especially for a Chinese made microphone, You should pick a Lewitt LCT 640 blows anything else out of the water for quality as your choice. Enjoy your Microphone!

AKG Pro Audio C214 Review: Condenser Mic with Superb SPL Handling

Nowadays, condenser mics remain popular for recording purposes. There are certain qualities that are unique to condenser mics that are unattainable by dynamic mics. Condenser mics tend to sound bright and highly crisp and articulate. That’s why condenser mics are still chosen for recording vocals. AKG is one of the most notable companies that produce mics, and there is the AKG Pro Audio C214, a condenser mic that has received lots of praises and compliments from the users. So, how great is AKG Pro Audio C214? Is it worth your money? Below, we will try to get to know better about this midrange condenser.

AKG Pro Audio C214 Review Condenser Mic with Superb SPL Handling

Design
Upon the first time meeting this mic, you will immediately get the feeling that this mic is all about being rugged and durable. Both the housing and the grille are all die-cast metal, featuring a shock- and scratch-resistant finish. In addition, the mic also comes with an integrated suspension system that is actually aimed to reduce mechanical noise and vibration, but can also play a role in minimizing the effect of an impact to the cartridge. As the effect, AKG Pro Audio C214 is unlike your typical vulnerable condenser; it has a robust roadworthy design that ensures that it is going to last. Plus, the matte grayish blue color and the bronze-colored grille make this mic appear very classy and elegant.

Features
AKG Pro Audio C214 is a cardioid mic. In other words, the mic captures sounds coming from the front, while rejecting signals from the sides and especially the rear. However, compared to a supercardioid, a cardioid mic still has a wider reception angle. That is beneficial in a sense that the mic is forgiving, still able to capture your voice even though you move slightly off-axis. The down side, a cardioid mic is relatively more prone to feedback, so you need to make sure that the mic will not capture any feedback signal from the recording environment.

AKG Pro Audio C214 comes with two onboard switches. These switches are for turning on/off the built-in bass cut filter and pre-attenuator. Both are very handy, allowing you to handle different conditions easily. The bass cut filter will lower the presence of frequencies under 160 Hz, useful for erasing breath and wind noise. Meanwhile, the pre-attenuator will lower the input signals by 20 dB, allowing you to record extremely loud sounds without distortion.

PriceFeatures

- Sonic character of the C414 XLII for beautifully detailed recording of lead vocals and solo instruments - Outstanding dynamic range and ultralow noise for close-up recording of high-output sources of up to 156dB SPL - Switchable 20dB attenuator and bass-cut filter for close-up recording and reduction of proximity effect - Integrated suspension to reduce mechanical noise and vibration from stage - Roadworthy design all-metal die-cast body with shock- and scratch-resistant finish

Performance
AKG Pro Audio C214 performs excellently and satisfyingly. The audio character is pretty much what you would expect from a condenser microphone. It is bright and accurate. We must say that the mic has managed to impress us with the superb clarity and articulate reproduction. The mic is able to capture sounds accurately and with fine details. It is a great choice for vocals, indeed, but it can do well for musical instruments when needed.

AKG Pro Audio C214 is a quiet mic. It has virtually no self-noise, as the equivalent noise level is barely 13 dB-A. The maximum SPL handling is 156 dB, which is awesome. Not many mics can handle such sound levels, especially in the price range. The superior SPL handling makes this mic very flexible and versatile.

Specifications of AKG Pro Audio C214
DESIGN
Finish: matte grayish blue
Net Weight: 280 g
Height: 160 mm
Width: 56 mm
GENERAL
Polar Pattern: Cardioid
Audio frequency bandwidth: 20 Hz– 20000 Hz
Equivalent noise level: 13 dB-A
Signal to Noise: 81 dB-A
Sensitivity: 20 mV/Pa
Bass cut filter: 160 Hz
Preattenuation Pad: -20 dB
Recommended load impedance: 1000 Ohms
Electrical impedance: 200 Ohms
POWERING INTERFACE
Current: 2 mA
Voltage: 9 V – 52 V
AUDIO OUTPUT
Type: Male Balanced XLR
Contacts: 3-pin

Pros of AKG Pro Audio C214
– Extremely high maximum SPL handling, allowing you to handle even the loudest volume levels
– Great frequency response range with bright, crisp, and accurate sound output
– Handy built-in bass cut filter and preattenuation pad
– Highly rugged and durable metallic housing
– Integrated suspension that effectively reduces mechanical vibrations and noise

Price of AKG Pro Audio C214
Check the best price of AKG Pro Audio C214 here!

Audix D6 Vs AKG D112 Comparison

If you are looking for a mic that focuses on specializing on handling kick drums, floor toms, or bass cabs, you make no mistake by considering Audix D6 and AKG D112. In the price range, these two are immensely popular products, loved by many users due to the superior properties. Well, Audix D6 and AKG D112 are both well-suited for particular instruments, but you need to be aware that they have different characteristics. Now, let us see the comparisons of the two models below!

audix-d6-vs-akg-d112

Design
If you put Audix D6 and AKG D112, you can see that they are roughly of the same size. The height is similar. AKG D112 is a little bit heavier than Audix D6 on paper, but the difference is hardly noticeable on the hand. Furthermore, AKG D112 has been equipped with an integrated flexible mount, which adds a good point in versatility. It can be mounted easily on anything to face any angle.

Both models are also equipped with a cardioid polar pattern. A cardioid polar pattern has been designed to pick up sound signals from the front side. It focuses on sounds that come on-axis, while rejecting off-axis sounds from the sides and rear. However, compared to supercardioid, cardioid’s pick-up angle is relatively wide that it still tolerates some off-axis sounds. It also delivers a more roomy and realistic audio reproduction.

Technical Specs

Audix D6AKG D112
- Type : Dynamic- Type : Balanced XLR
- Polar Pattern : Cardioid- Polar Pattern : Cardioid
- Frequency Response : 30Hz - 15kHz- Audio frequency bandwidth : 20 to 17000 Hz
- Impedance : 280 ohms- Recommended load impedance : 2000 Ohms
- Sensitivity : 0.8 mV/Pa @ 80Hz- Sensitivity : 1.8 mV/Pa

Performance
As mentioned above, Audix D6 and AKG D112 have different characteristics. In general, Audix D6 is able to capture the punchiest click for bassdrum. It captures more of the beating and action. On the other hand, AKG D112 has deeper and fuller bass, capturing the bounce and resonance well.

Audix D6 comes with a frequency response range of 30 Hz – 15 kHz. It has ground-shaking low-end with superior clarity and attack. The bass reproduction is awesome, but Audix D6 is mostly noted for the chesty sound and snappier high-end. It is able to catch the true weight of the kick, the beating, and delivers the punchiest click when handling bassdrum.

On the other hand, AKG D112 comes with a frequency response range of 20 Hz – 17 kHz. As you can see, the frequency response range is much wider here. This, in effect, allows for improved audio staging and imaging. AKG D112 is able to capture and reproduce lows, mids, and highs accurately. The lower low-frequency reach also allows for enhanced bass performance. The bass is deeper, fuller, more solid, and with more oomph. The specially engineered diaphragm captures bounce and resonance under 100Hz very well. The narrow band presence rise at 4kHz allows you to punch through a dense mix with no or just little EQ. In addition, AKG D112 also offers a very high maximum SPL handling. AKG D112 is able to handle up to 160 dB SPL without any audible distortion. It is very handy for taking care of loud volume levels.

Audix D6 Vs AKG D112

- Ground shaking low end with clarity and attack
- Ideally suited for kick drum, floor toms, bass cabs
- VLM (very low mass) diaphragm provides excellent transient response
- Large-diaphragm dynamic microphone for bass instruments
- Extremely high SPL capability
- Classic microphone for stage and studio applications

Conclusion
Audix D6 and AKG D112 are both great in their own ways. In general, AKG D112 makes the most versatile approach, thanks to the wide frequency response range and high SPL handling. However, if you seek a mic with the most click for bassdrum, get Audix D6.

AKG P220 Vs Rode NT1A Comparison

Are you wondering whether you should go with AKG P220 or Rode NT1A? Of course, both AKG P220 and Rode NT1A are true condenser microphones available at relatively affordable and budget-friendly price points. Both products have received a lot of positive reviews on the market. Thus, we can be certain here that both are decent products. Even so, Rode NT1A is usually being priced a little bit higher over AKG P220. Another thing to note, AKG P220 and Rode NT1A actually have different audio characteristics. So, before you make a choice, make sure that you are aware of the differences between them!

akg-p220-vs-rode-nt1a

Design
In terms of design, of course, you can see that the two products differ from each other. AKG P220 comes with an all-metal housing for maximum ruggedness and durability. The body is colored in black while the grille is light brown. On the other hand, Rode NT1A comes with a silvery hue, also with a solid metal housing. It features internal capsule shock mounting to eliminate handling noise. Compared to AKG P220, Rode NT1A is slimmer and lighter, making it more convenient to handle.

Technical Specs

AKG P220Rode NT1A
- Audio frequency bandwidth : 20 to 20000 Hz - Large 1" (25mm) capsule with gold plated diaphragm
- Equivalent noise level : 16 dB-A- Cardioid polar pattern
- Sensitivity : 20 mV/Pa- Self noise of only 5dB (A)
- Signal to Noise : 78 dB-A- Ultra low noise, transformerless surface mount circuitry
- Preattenuation Pad : -20 dB- Wide dynamic range
- Bass cut filter : 300 - 12 dB/octave Hz- Gold plated output contacts
- Electrical impedance : <= 200 Ohms- Internal capsule shock mounting

Both models come with a cardioid polar pattern. So, they pick up sounds the best from the front side. Sounds coming from the sides and especially the rear will be rejected. This polar pattern allows you to isolate the main audio source from background noise.

Read also : AKG P220 Vs P420 Comparison.

Performance
Both mics come with a frequency response range of 20 Hz – 20 kHz. Such configuration allows these mics to capture sufficient lows, mids, and highs to deliver well-staged and accurate bass, midrange, and treble. However, their different designs make them have different output characteristics. AKG P220 delivers bright and clear sounds, but is not very warm. Yet, AKG P220 is quite sensitive, with a sensitivity level of 20 mV/Pa. The mic is quite silent, without too much operation noise.

However, on the other hand, Rode NT1A boasts superb clarity in its audio reproduction. Rode NT1A is ultimately very silent; it only has a self-noise level of 5 dB-A! With the mic, you can capture any vocal with virtually no noise. It is also able to capture subtle details, and delivers warm, accurate, and pristine-clear audio reproduction. It also has a decent maximum SPL handling, 137 dB SPL, allowing you tackle loud input levels with ease.

Feature
AKG P220 has been equipped with a -20 dB pre-attenuation pad to allow you to handle high input levels, and a bass-cut filter for vocal presence boost. The mic comes along with a shock mount and a metal carrying case.

Rode NT1A’s ultra-low self-noise level and internal capsule shock mounting have allowed for superior clarity. It also comes with a pop filter that you can use to filter away wind and breath sounds, and a dust cover for storage and travel.

AKG P220 Vs Rode NT1A

- Audio Frequency response: 20Hz to 20kHz
- Max SPL: 155 dB
- Sensitivity: 20 mV/Pa
- Pattern and type Capsule: Condenser
- 10 Year warranty on the Rode NT1-A
- Large 1" (25mm) capsule with gold plated diaphragm
- Self noise of only 5dB (A)
- premium 20' microphone cable

Conclusion
In general, Rode NT1A is the best way to go. The ultra-low self-noise level and excellent warmth, crisp, and clarity really generate superior audio reproduction. AKG P220 is viable if you prefer a different audio character.

AKG P220 Vs P420 Comparison

P220 and P420 are two microphones produced by AKG. If you are looking for a condenser microphone for vocals, they can be excellent choices. They are especially loved by users who tend to sing powerfully, those people who scream into the mic, because AKG P220 and AKG P420 both boast very high maximum SPL handling. They also have excellent performance at virtually any frequency. Well, despite the similarities, AKG P420 is being priced higher than AKG P220. So, what are the differences between AKG P420 and AKG P220? Which is the model that you should get?

akg-p220-vs-p420

Design
Quite interestingly, AKG P220 and AKG P420 actually come with a very similar design. They each measure by 165 mm long and with 54 mm diameter. They also have a similar weight of 530g. They each has a very rugged black all-metal housing and a light brown grille. If not for the written text and onboard switches, you will not be able to tell which one is which.

Technical Specs

AKG P220AKG P420
- Audio frequency bandwidth : 20 to 20000 Hz - Audio frequency bandwidth : 20 to 20000 Hz
- Equivalent noise level : 16 dB-A- Equivalent noise level : 15 dB-A
- Sensitivity : 20 mV/Pa- Sensitivity : 28 mV/Pa
- Signal to Noise : 78 dB-A- Signal to Noise : 79 dB-A
- Preattenuation Pad : -20 dB- Preattenuation Pad :-20 dB
- Bass cut filter : 300 - 12 dB/octave Hz- Bass cut filter : 300 - 12 dB/octave Hz
- Electrical impedance : <= 200 Ohms- Electrical impedance : <= 200 Ohms

If you put AKG P220 and AKG P420 next to each other, you can then notice that they do come with different onboard switches. AKG P220 only has two switches, placed on the front. The first switch is to activate the pre-attenuation pad, which functions to lower the input gain level by 20dB in order to effectively increase the maximum SPL handling. This is very handy when you need to take care of loud volume levels. The second switch is to activate the bass-cut filter. The bass roll-off switch functions to attenuate the lower frequencies, which can be necessary when you don’t want to capture low-frequency noise such as wind sounds, breath sounds, and mechanical vibrations. AKG P220 has a cardioid polar pattern.

On the other hand, AKG P420 has those two switches on the rear. On the front, there is only a single switch that functions to select the desired polar pattern. Yes, AKG P420 features a one-inch dual-diaphragm design that allows the mic to have three selectable polar patterns: cardioid, figure-eight, and omnidirectional. So, AKG P420 has the versatility to face any recording condition and requirement.

Performance
Both of these two models have a frequency response range of 20 Hz – 20 kHz, which is nice. They can capture lows, mids, and highs with excellent accuracy and clarity. As condenser mics, they also deliver bright and crisp audio reproduction. They reproduce vocals very well and realistically. However, between the two, AKG P420 is indeed better compared to AKG P220. This is due to the fact that AKG P420 has better sensitivity and a slightly lower equivalent self-noise level. Thus, AKG P420 is able to capture more subtle audio details, more properly characterizing the unique vocal type. The clarity is also slightly improved.

AKG P220 Vs P420

- Audio Frequency response: 20Hz to 20kHz
- Sensitivity: 20 mV/Pa
- Pattern and type Capsule: Condenser
- One-inch dual-diaphragm microphone with three selectable polar patterns for the perfect setting
- Low noise electronics and transformer less output for high dynamic range
- Switchable attenuation pad for high SPL applications up to 155 dB SPL

Conclusion
In general, AKG P420 is indeed the best choice here. Besides having multiple selectable polar patterns, the audio quality is also enhanced. AKG P420 is also very versatile, able to perform in any recording condition.

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