AKG C214 Vs AT4040 Comparison

Two popular condenser mics on the market, AKG C214 and Audio-Technica AT4040, often cause people to get confused when choosing for the right microphone for their works. The two products are currently available in the same price range, with a very marginal price difference between them. Furthermore, they do share a lot of similar configurations and features. Needless to say, two different microphone models tend to have each own typical characteristics and distinctions, no matter how many similarities that they share with each other. These unique features are the factors to consider in choosing the right mic that can suit your needs and requirements best. So, what are the differences between AKG C214 and Audio-Technica AT4040?

AKG C214 Vs AT4040

Performance and Output Quality
Both AKG C214 and Audio-Technica AT4040 are condenser microphones. As the effect, like many other condenser microphones, the two tend to produce bright and crisp sounds. These are the characteristics that people love about condenser mics, especially the people who want to preserve the original tones, colors, and details of the sounds. If we delve a little bit further, AKG C214 and Audio-Technica AT4040 both have the same frequency response range, 20 Hz- 20 kHz. They are able to capture the same lows, mids, and highs. They also have quite similar levels of sensitivity and noise. They are quite sensitive to subtle sounds, but not excessively. They are also very quite; you can get a crystal-clear recording quality with either model. (Read also: AKG C214 Vs Rode NT1A Comparison)

Technical Specs

AKG C214Audio-Technica AT4040
- Audio Frequency bandwidth 20 to 20000 Hz- FREQUENCY RESPONSE: 20-20,000 Hz
- Sensitivity 20 mV/Pa- Sensitivity -32 dB (25.1 mV) re 1V at 1 Pa
- Equivalent Noise Level 13 dB-A- Equivalent Noise Level 12 dB SPL
- Signal to Noise 81 dB-A- SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO 82 dB, 1 kHz at 1 Pa
- Electrical Impedance 200 Ohms- IMPEDANCE: 100 ohms

However, if we put the two mics into tests, we can indeed notice some distinctions in the audio reproduction. Between the two, AKG C214 seems to tame the high frequencies quite more significantly than Audio-Technica AT4040. This is good for suppressing aggressive spiky notes. However, this may also affect negatively in a sense that AKG C214 sounds kind of flat. For recording some instruments, as an example, you may want to keep the energetic frequency response at high-end. AKG C214 also suppresses the bass slightly more than Audio-Technica AT4040.

Features
Another interesting thing is that the two mics come with similar yet different additional features. Each of them comes with switchable pre-attenuation pad and bass-cut filter. However, AKG C214 comes with a -20dB pre-attenuation pad and a 160 Hz bass-cut filter, while Audio-Technica AT4040 offers a -10dB pad and 80 Hz filter. With all the pre-attenuation pads switched on, both products have similar maximum SPL handling.

Additionally, AKG C214 boasts a superbly durable all-metal die-cast body with shock and scratch resistance. It has an integrated suspension for reducing physical noises and vibrations. Audio-Technica AT4040 is also well-known as a rugged heavy-duty mic, featuring a custom shock mount for superior isolation and nickel-plated internal components.

AKG C214 Vs AT4040

- Technically-advanced large diaphragm tensioned specifically to provide smooth, natural sonic characteristics
- Externally polarized (DC bias) true condenser design, Exceptionally low noise, wide dynamic range and high-SPL capability for greatest versatility
- Transformerless circuitry virtually eliminates low-frequency distortion and provides superior correlation of high-speed transients
- Precision-machined, nickel-plated brass, acoustic element baffle provides enhanced element stability and optimal sensitivity
- State-of-the-art surface-mount electronics ensure compliance with A-T's stringent consistency and reliability standards
- Sonic character of the C414 XLII for beautifully detailed recording of lead vocals and solo instruments
- Outstanding dynamic range and ultralow noise for close-up recording of high-output sources of up to 156dB SPL
- Switchable 20dB attenuator and bass-cut filter for close-up recording and reduction of proximity effect
- Integrated suspension to reduce mechanical noise and vibration from stage
- Roadworthy design all-metal die-cast body with shock- and scratch-resistant finish

Conclusion
Both mics are excellent products, for sure. You can’t really go wrong with either mic. However, for vocals that are thin or reedy, you may prefer AKG C214, as it is capable of taming excessive treble voices. Audio-Technica AT4040 is the way for a more versatile mic that can be used for both vocals and instruments.

Rode NTK Vs K2 Comparison

Are you in a disquiet because you are wondering whether you should purchase Rode NTK or Rode K2? Despite the differences in names, looks, and prices, the two products still share quite a lot of similarities and resemblances with each other. Rode NTK comes with a darker brown hue and is a little bit more affordable. On the other hand, Rode K2 has a light brown, almost silverish color. It is also a little bit more expensive compared to Rode NTK. Most of their internal systems seem to be identical. Well, is that so?

Rode NTK Vs K2

The Similarities
Indeed, both Rode NTK and Rode K2 are tube condenser microphones. They both have pressure gradient acoustic principle, and each uses valve/tube impedance converter with bipolar output buffer. Each uses a 1” capsule. They have a similar frequency response range of 20 Hz – 20 kHz, so they can capture the same lows, mids, and highs. They have the same output impedance of 200 Ohms. (Please read also: Rode NTK Vs Neumann TLM 102)

Technical Specs

Rode NTKRode K2
- Frequency Range: 20Hz - 20kHz- Frequency Range: 20Hz - 20kHz
- Output Impedance: 200Ω- Output Impedance: 200Ω
- 158dB SPL (@ 1kHz, 1% THD into 1KΩ load)- Maximum SPL: 162dB SPL (@ 1kHz, 1% THD into 1KΩ load)162dB SPL (@ 1kHz, 1% THD into 1KΩ load)
- Maximum Output Level: 29.0mV- Maximum Output Level: 30.0mV
- Sensitivity: -38.0dB re 1 Volt/Pascal (25.00mV @ 94 dB SPL) +/- 2 dB @ 1kHz- Sensitivity: -36.0dB re 1 Volt/Pascal (16.00mV @ 94 dB SPL) +/- 2 dB @ 1kHz
- Equivalent Noise Level (A-weighted): 12dB-A- Equivalent Noise Level (A-weighted): 10dB-A
- Power Options: Power supply included- Power Options: Power supply included
- Address Type: Side- Address Type: Side
- Polar Pattern: Cardioid- Polar Pattern: Cardioid, Figure 8, Omnidirectional
- Capsule: 1.00"- Capsule: 1.00"
- Active Electronics: Valve/tube impedance converter with bipolar output buffer- Active Electronics: Valve/tube impedance converter with bipolar output buffer
- Acoustic Principle: Pressure Gradient- Acoustic Principle: Pressure Gradient

They both are side-address mics. They do have identical overall dimensions, as each of them measures by 208mm x 55mm x 55mm. They both require being powered using a power supply, which is included in their bundles. They both have XLR output.

The Differences
Perhaps the first difference that we can notice when holding both mics at the same time is that Rode K2 is slightly heavier than Rode NTK. This is due to the K2 having more internal components than the NTK.

Rode K2 has multiple polar patterns. Its polar pattern can be switched between cardioid, figure eight, and omnidirectional. The cardioid picks up sounds especially from the front, slightly from the sides, and attenuates the rear. The figure eight picks up from the front and the rear, and not from the sides. Meanwhile, the omnidirectional picks up sound from all directions equally well. Having multiple polar patterns can be very beneficial, as you have the versatility needed to handle different recording needs and conditions. On the other hand, Rode NTK only has a single cardioid polar pattern.

In addition, the K2 features slightly lower equivalent noise level (10 dB-A) and higher output level (30 mV) compared to the NTK (12 dB-A, 29 mB). As the effect, the K2 can deliver even cleaner, stronger sounds than the already excellent NTK. The K2 also has a slightly higher maximum SPL handling than the NTK, which allows the mic to capture louder voices without distortion.

Last but not least, Rode K2 actually comes with newer capsule design the NTK. The improved design indeed improves the audio reproduction quality. Compared to the NTK that can be quite harsh at times, Rode K2 typically sounds smoother and more pleasant to the ears while staying bright and crisp enough. The K2 also has much less high-end bites than the NTK.

Rode NTK Vs K2

- Large 1 inch capsule with gold plated diaphragm
- Class A valve circuitry
- Ultra low noise
- Wide dynamic range
- Hand-selected and graded 6922 twin-triode valve
- Large 1" capsule with gold sputtered diaphragm and internal shock mounting
- Ultra low noise
- Wide dynamic range
- Class 'A' valve circuitry
- Hand-selected and graded 6922 twin-triode valve

Conclusion
So, should you pick Rode K2 or Rode NTK? The NTK is good, but the K2 is better. The smoother audio characteristic can be very beneficial in recordings. Besides, the multiple polar patterns add a great deal of versatility!

Shure SM7B Vs AKG C214 Comparison

Shure SM7B and AKG C214 are both microphones tailored especially for vocals. They stand in the same price range, though usually, the price of Shure SM7B is a little bit higher than AKG C214’s price. Even so, the similarities may end there, because the two products are very different from each other. Not only they have different looks and shapes, but also they have different internal mechanisms – and, as the effect, different tonal characteristics, too. As for the moment, you must be wondering what the differences are between Shure SM7B and AKG C214, and about which microphone model that will suit you best. Well, you can put yourself at ease now, because we are going to take a good look at each product!

Shure SM7B Vs AKG C214

Shure SM7B
Shure SM7B is a dynamic microphone characterized by its typical warmth and smoothness. It is the mic that can handle all kinds of loud and high-pitched human voices with ease. You can scream all the way into it, and it will still produce such a sweet audio reproduction with acceptable levels. It also smoothes out low-frequency noise very well to the point that wind and breath sounds can be attenuated very well. It also reduces plosives very significantly. It doesn’t sound very bright.

Shure SM7B is designed sophisticatedly, with improved rejection against electromagnetic hum and broadband interference that is emitted by computer monitors. Furthermore, it comes with a highly effective built-in pop filter, so that you will not have to get additional equipment for protection against breath sounds, even for close-up vocals. It has a cardioid polar pattern with a frequency response range of 50 Hz – 20 kHz. There are bass roll-off and midrange emphasis controls with a graphic display of the response setting.

Technical Specs

Shure SM7BAKG C214
- Frequency Response: 50 Hz - 20 kHz- Audio Frequency bandwidth 20 to 20000 Hz
- Sensitivity (1 kHz): -59,0 dBV/Pa / 1,12 mV/Pa- Sensitivity 20 mV/Pa
- Max SPL: 180 dB- Signal to Noise 81 dB-A
- 150 Ohms (Low)- Electrical Impedance 200 Ohms
- Polar Pattern: Cardioid- Polar Pattern cardioid

AKG C214
Unlike Shure SM7B, AKG C214 is a condenser microphone. Thus, it is a lot brighter and crispier. It is modeled after AKG C414 XLII for delivering excellent details on lead vocals and solo instruments, except that it features only one polar pattern, which is cardioid. Due to its nature, it is also very sensitive to sounds. As the effect, it can capture subtle sound details and accurate sounds, as well as some ambient background noises. So, it is best for use in a treated, controlled environment to reduce the possibility of capturing unwanted noises. It is quite bright, so some high-pitched singers may cause it to generate ear-slicing sounds. (See also: AKG C214 Vs AT4040 Comparison)

AKG C214 boasts a very durable and rugged all-metal die-cast body, which is furtherly enhanced with shock and scratch-resistant finish. It has an integrated suspension for reducing mechanical vibration and noise. Plus, there are a switchable -20dB attenuator and a bass-cut filter for close-up recording and reducing the proximity effect.

Shure SM7B Vs AKG C214

- Flat, wide-range frequency response for exceptionally clean and natural reproduction of both music and speech
- Improved rejection of electromagnetic hum, optimized for shielding against broadband interference emitted by computer monitors
- Now shipping with the A7WS detachable windscreen, designed to reduce plosive sounds and gives a warmer tone for close-talk vocals
- Classic cardioid polar pattern, uniform with frequency and symmetrical about axis, to provide maximum rejection and minimum coloration of off-axis sound
- Includes foam winscreen, close-talk windscreen, and locking yoke mount.
- Sonic character of the C414 XLII for beautifully detailed recording of lead vocals and solo instruments
- Outstanding dynamic range and ultralow noise for close-up recording of high-output sources of up to 156dB SPL
- Switchable 20dB attenuator and bass-cut filter for close-up recording and reduction of proximity effect
- Integrated suspension to reduce mechanical noise and vibration from stage
- Roadworthy design all-metal die-cast body with shock- and scratch-resistant finish

Conclusion
A lot of people love Shure SM7B because it is indeed able to deliver uniquely warm and sweet sounds. However, it is best only for energetic singers and taming high-pitched sounds. On the other hand, for weak and subtle vocals, you should choose AKG C214. The condenser microphone is brighter; it can help a lot in boosting the presence, clarity, and accuracy of subtle sounds.

AKG C414 Vs Neumann U87 Comparison

If you have prepared quite some dollars to be spent for a premium quality microphone for professional purposes, then you make no mistake by considering to get either AKG C414 or Neumann U87. These are the studio-grade microphones that boast the top levels of performance. They each also offers multiple polar patterns that you can select for specific requirements and circumstances at hand. However, Neumann U87 is a typically pricey mic, while AKG C414 is certainly a more affordable and budget-friendlier one. Which is the mic that you should get?

AKG C414 Vs Neumann U87

In terms of output quality, AKG C414 and Neumann U87 can be quite similar to each other. For sure, they can provide you with an astonishing sonic reproduction. They both have a frequency response range of 20 Hz – 20 kHz so that they can capture the same low, mid, and high frequencies. They both can generate such a superb audio reproduction with very high tonal accuracy, excellent sound imaging, and full, solid sound levels. Nevertheless, AKG C414 boasts an extremely low equivalent noise level. The self-noise level is barely 6dB-A! For sure, AKG C414 can record sounds with astonishing clarity. On the other hand, however, Neumann U87 has also actually considered very quiet already, as it has a self-noise level that spans from 12 to 15 dB-A, depending on the selected polar pattern. Well, worth a note, Neumann U87 has slightly lower signal-to-noise levels than AKG C414. Both require 48V phantom power.

Technical Specs

AKG C414Neumann U87
- Audio Frequency bandwidth 20 to 20000 Hz- Frequency range 20 Hz ... 20 kHz
- Sensitivity 23 mV/Pa- Sensitivity at 1 kHz into 1 kohm 20/28/22 mV/Pa1)
- Equivalent Noise Level 6 dB-A- Equivalent noise level, CCIR2) 26/23/25 dB1) - Equivalent noise level, A-weighted2) 15/12/14 dB-A1)
- Signal to Noise 88 dB-A- Signal-to-noise ratio, CCIR2) (rel. 94 dB SPL) 68/71/69 dB1) - Signal-to-noise ratio, A-weighted2) (rel. 94 dB SPL) 79/82/80 dB1)
- Preattunation Pad -6; -12; -18 dB- Maximum SPL for THD 0.5%3) 117 dB (cardioid) - Maximum SPL for THD 0.5% with preattenuation3) 127 dB
- Electrical Impedance 200 Ohms- Rated impedance 200 ohms
- Recommended Load Impedance- Rated load impedance,1 kohms

Furthermore, AKG C414 comes with a three-level pre-attenuation pad that can be set for -6dB, -12dB, or -18dB, while Neumann U87 only has a switchable -10dB pad. As the effect, AKG C414 has a maximum SPL handling of 158dB, while Neumann U87 has a maximum SPL handling of only 127dB. As you can see, AKG C414 is actually more tolerable to high sound levels, and perhaps can be used more reliably for close-up recordings. To emphasize this feature, AKG C414 is furtherly armed with a three-level bass-cut filter as well, which you can set for 40Hz, 80Hz, or 160Hz. The bass-cut filter is a handy tool that you can utilize for eliminating low-frequency noise such as physical vibrations or wind and breath sounds.

Even though these microphones both boast multiple polar patterns, Neumann U87 only comes with three selectable choices: omnidirectional, cardioid, and figure-eight plus. At the contrast, AKG C414 has a total of nine selectable polar patterns, consisting of omnidirectional, wide cardioid, cardioid, hyper cardioid, and figure-eight, with an intermediate configuration in between every transition. Hence, you can have more versatility and flexibility from AKG C414.

- Sonic character of the famous AKG C12 delivers astounding sound quality for lead vocals and solo instruments
- Nine selectable polar patterns for the perfect setting for every application
- Three attenuation levels (-6/-12/-18dB) for close-up recording or high-output sources of up to 158dB SPL
- Three switchable different bass-cut filters to reduce wind noise, stage vibration or proximity effect
- 3 selectable directional patterns: omnidirectional, cardioid, and figure
-810dB attenuation switch127dB
- SPL handling 20Hz to 20kHz response
- Impedance rated at 200 ohms

Conclusion
In many ways, AKG C414 and Neumann U87 are largely equal. People tend to love Neumann U87 because it is a classical masterpiece that has such elegance, class, and prestige. However, AKG C414 is actually a very viable alternative that can deliver similar performance and output quality, coming even more feature-packed, and yet available at a much more affordable price. Therefore, for the fullest value out of your money, you should pick AKG C414.

Samson Meteor Vs Blue Yeti Comparison

Are you confused in choosing between Samson Meteor and Blue Yeti? Both of them are USB plug-and-play microphones that are both very popular on the market. Blue Yeti is a mic that is praised by many because of its versatile performance. On the other hand, Samson Meteor is often referred as the go-to choice for many people because of the superior output quality. Another thing to note, Samson Meteor is quite more affordable than Blue Yeti. Which is the microphone that you should purchase?

Samson Meteor Vs Blue Yeti

General Design
Both mics are very compact, lightweight, and portable. You can easily bring them along whenever and wherever. Samson Meteor comes with three foldable legs, which can be very handy for storage and placement. Blue Yeti has a slightly taller physicality, but the mic can be folded down as well to save some space. Both models have several on-board controls and features. Each of them has each own indicator light and a headphone output for direct monitoring, complete with a dedicated volume control knob. Both Samson Meteor and Blue Yeti are plug-and-play USB microphones, so you don’t need to perform any annoying installation process on different devices. (Take a look: Razer Seiren Vs Blue Yeti)

Technical Specs

Samson MeteorBlue Yeti
- Smooth, flat frequency response of 20Hz-20kHz- Frequency Response: 20Hz - 20kHz
- 16-bit, 44.1/48kHz resolution- Bit Rate: 16bit
- Large, 25mm diaphragm USB studio condenser microphone- The ultimate professional USB microphone
- Stereo 1/8" headphone jack for no latency monitoring- 3.5-millimeter headphone jack

Polar Pattern
However, Samson Meteor has a cardioid polar pattern, which means that it captures sounds the best from the front while attenuating the sides and rear. Such configuration is the most common in most mics, allowing you to focus on a single direction of the audio source. Hence, Samson Meteor can be viable for speech and music recording, podcasting, and broadcasting. On the other hand, Blue Yeti boasts about having a tri-capsule array and multiple polar patterns, making it ready to serve for wider purposes. You can set Blue Yeti to be cardioid, bidirectional, omnidirectional, or stereo, allowing the mic to handle interviews and field recordings with ease.

Output Quality
We have seen that Blue yet is designed for superior versatility and flexibility. However, if we now come to talk about output quality, Samson Meteor is the superior one between the two. Each of the two models has a frequency response range of 20 Hz – 20 kHz. They both also record in 16-bit. Blue Yeti has a 48 kHz sample rate, while Samson Meteor allows the user to select for 44.1 kHz or 48 kHz.

Comparing the sonic characteristics of the two products, Samson Meteor is easily the one that can sound correctly right after plugging the mic in. It reproduces sounds more accurately, with a more natural and realistic frequency response. It is especially less prone to ambient noise. On the contrary, Blue Yeti may need your effort in settings and adjustments because Blue Yeti is very sensitive to ambient noise. The tones can also be a little bit too bright, so you may want to add some EQ.

Samson Meteor Vs Blue Yeti

- Stereo 1/8" headphone jack for no latency monitoring.
- Large, 25mm diaphragm USB studio condenser microphone.
- Works with iPad using Apple's Lightning USB Camera Adapter or Camera Connection Kit (30-pin).
- Gain control, mute button, zero-latency headphone output. Requires a minimum of 64 MB of RAM
- Perfect for vocals, musical instruments, podcasting, voiceovers, interviews, field recordings, conference calls
- Plug 'n play - Mac OS X (10.4.11 or higher) and PC (Windows 8.1, 8, 7, Vista, XP). Bit Rate: 16bit

Conclusion
If you are fine with a cardioid polar pattern, or you usually only record sounds coming from a single direction, then you should pick Samson Meteor. The audio quality is quite noticeably better. And, due to the lower price, it is the best bang for the bucks. You may choose Blue Yeti only if you don’t mind the extra sensitivity and brightness for the sake of the multiple polar patterns.

MXL 770 Vs 990 Comparison

Are you in a disquiet because you are unable to choose between MXL 770 and MXL 990? Of course, both of them are condenser microphones that can be used with a computer via the USB connection. However, they are being priced a little bit differently from each other. You may have guessed that MXL 990 is pricier than MXL 770 due to the numbers in their names, and you are correct. The price gap is not a very huge one, but still is a reason to carefully choose between the two. MXL 770 and MXL 990 are, in fact, quite different from each other. Here is the comparison of the two models.

MXL 770 Vs 990

Before we continue this article, let us also take a look at MXL 770 Vs AT2020 Comparison at glance.

Design
MXL 770 is a microphone colored in black with some golden lining and font. On the other hand, MXL 990 is silver, with black lining and font. They both weigh similarly and are of the same size. However, you should take a note that MXL 770 has a cardioid polar pattern. MXL 770 captures sounds the best from the front, while attenuating the sides and especially the rear. As the effect, MXL 770 can be somewhat less prone to ambient noise. On the other hand, MXL 990 has a 90-degree X/Y stereo polar pattern, making it capable of recreating a realistic sound imaging, but it can also be a little bit more sensitive to ambient noise as well. Both of these mics are perhaps better suited for usage in a treated environment, because, in general, they are both very sensitive to capture subtle sounds.

Technical Specs

MXL 770MXL 990
- Gold-sputtered, 6-micron, low distortion diaphragm- 3/4" gold-sputtered diaphragm
- Frequency Range: 30Hz-20kHz- 30Hz-20kHz frequency response
- Max SPL for 0.5% THD 137dB- 130dB maximum SPL
- Sensitivity: 15mV/Pa- Sensitivity: 15MV/pa
- Equivalent Noise: 20dB (A weighted IEC 268-4)- Equivalent noise: 20dB (A-weighted) Wired with Mogami cable

Feature
The features that these microphones come with are not always specifically mentioned, so we may sometimes fail to acknowledge the features available in each. Nonetheless, MXL 770 comes with a switchable 6dB/octave @150Hz high-pass filter and -10dB pre-attenuation pad. These features can be very beneficial in usage. You can have the edge to reduce the presence of low-frequency noise, eliminating wind and breath sounds as well as vibrations, while boosting the midrange and treble, effectively bulking up the presence of the vocal or instrument at hand. On the other hand, MXL 990 does not have the bass cut filter. Instead, it comes with a three-position pre-attenuation pad that can be set in Hi (0dB), Medium (-5dB), or Lo (-10dB).

They also have different frequency response ranges. MXL 770 has a frequency response range of 30 Hz – 20 kHz, while MXL 990’s frequency response range is 20 Hz – 20 kHz. As you can see, MXL 990 can actually reach and capture lower frequencies, making it able to deliver fuller and more solid bass.

Output Quality
Comparing the output of the two microphones, they are indeed noticeably different from each other. Both are very sensitive to subtle sounds, for sure, and they can capture all the subtle details of the sounds coming in. However, MXL 770 is the warmer one between the two. MXL 770 especially emphasizes the midrange. On the contrary, MXL 990 sounds quite brighter, and there is a little bit more presence of bass and treble.

MXL 770 Vs 990

- FET preamp with balanced output
- Switchable bass cut and -10dB pad
- Legendary MXL sonic characteristics
- Comes with shock mount and rugged carrying case
- With Shock Mount has a silky, sweet high end while retaining tight, solid low and midrange reproduction
- Attractive vintage body style with champagne finish
- Includes custom shock mount, mic stand adapter, and case
- Requires phantom power

Conclusion
In general, MXL 770 and MXL990 are both decent mics. You should pick MXL 7770 is you prefer a warm mic that especially boost the midrange, or if you are more comfortable with a cardioid polar pattern. To capture a more realistic stereo image, you can pick MXL 990.

Rode Lavalier Vs SmartLav Comparison

Choosing for the right lapel mic that you can use to get the best quality recording possible is completely no easy task, for sure. Unlike regular-sized mics that you use by holding them in your hands, you need to mind a lot about compactness and portability when you are choosing for a lapel mic. Among the choices on the market, we have Rode Lavalier and Rode SmarLav. These microphones seem to be very, very similar to each other, and they are both very popular choices for beginners and professionals alike. However, Rode Lavalier is significantly more expensive than Rode SmartLav. The price gap is real, and you may be wondering what the differences are between the two models. Which is the one that you should pick?

Rode Lavalier Vs SmartLav

Design
Lavalier and SmartLav do share a similar shape, as what you can expect about how a lapel mic is shaped. Both are black in color. However, Rode Lavalier is completely black, while Rode SmartLav has a gray end near the jack. Furthermore, you may have noticed that Rode SmartLav is quite noticeably bigger and heavier than Rode Lavalier. SmartLav is 6 grams while Lavalier is barely 1 gram. While the difference may seem trivial, we tend to prefer something that is smaller and lighter for a lapel mic. We don’t want the mic to particularly take a lot of attention from the audiences in live performances. If the mic is too heavy, it may cause your clothing to fold, too. (Related versus: Rode Lavalier Vs Sennheiser ME2)

Technical Specs

Rode LavalierRode SmartLav
- Acoustic Principle: Pressure Gradient- Acoustic Principle: Permanently Polarise
- Active Electronics: JFET impedance converter- Active Electronics: JFET
- Capsule: 0.10"- Capsule: 0.10"
- Frequency Range: 60Hz - 18kHz- Frequency Range: 60Hz - 18kHz
- Output Impedance: 3000Ω- Output Impedance: 3Ω
- Maximum SPL: 110dB SPL (@ 1kHz, 1% THD into 1KΩ load)- Maximum SPL: 110dB SPL (@ 1kHz, 1% THD into 1KΩ load)
- Maximum Output Level: 189.0mV- Maximum Output Level: 189.0mV
- Sensitivity: -33.5dB re 1 Volt/Pascal (21.00mV @ 94 dB SPL) +/- 2 dB @ 1kHz- Sensitivity: -35.0dB re 1 Volt/Pascal (17.80mV @ 94 dB SPL) +/- 2 dB @ 1kHz
- Equivalent Noise Level (A-weighted): 25dB-A- Equivalent Noise Level (A-weighted): 27dB-A
- Dimensions: 12.00mmH x 4.50mmW x 4.50mmD- Dimensions: 1180.00mmH x 4.50mmW x 4.50mmD

Furthermore, Rode SmartLav itself is pretty durable. However, Rode Lavalier is the one that is ready for any sort of heavy duties, as the cable is reinforced by Kevlar shielding, ensuring the durability to the max. The cable is even able to endure strain tests up to 10 kg. The mini-furry pop filter is not only able to provide excellent protection against wind and breath sounds – as well as attenuating excessive plosives – but also water-resistant! You don’t have to worry about performing under some rain or getting some splashes with Rode Lavalier.

Performance
Both of these mics may seem to be identical to each other, but they actually have very different qualities. Both of them are omnidirectional so that they can pick up sounds equally well from any direction. The frequency response range of Rode SmartLav is 20Hz – 20kHz, which means that the mic is capable of capturing and reproducing some decent bass, midrange, and treble. On the other hand, Rode Lavalier only has a frequency response range of 60 Hz – 18 kHz. However, it is armed with higher impedance, SPL handling, sensitivity, and lower self-noise level. As the effect, it can actually deliver more accurate, detailed, fuller vivid sounds. The slightly lower equivalent noise level is also beneficial for getting more clarity.

Rode Lavalier Vs SmartLav

- Anti-trauma water resistant storage case
- Water resistant pop filter. Mini-furry for high wind protection.
- Shielded, detachable Kevlar® reinforced cableLapel-style cable management clip
- Adapter sold separately.
- Polar Pattern: Omnidirectional
- Address Type: End
- Output: TRRS
- Warranty: 1 year

Conclusion
If you are limited in budget, you can pick Rode SmartLav. It has a pretty good performance, and is quite versatile for many purposes due to the wide frequency response range. However, if you have some extra bucks and especially for capturing human voices, you should go with Rode Lavalier for the ultimate ruggedness and durability, as well as improved sonic qualities.

Rode NTG 2 Vs Sennheiser MKE 600

For video shooting, a lot of people tend to prefer to use a shotgun mic for capturing high-quality audio. This is because a shotgun mic has several unique characteristics and benefits. To begin with, it is able to capture clear and bright sounds even though it is placed not directly under the people’s chins. It can be hidden from the video’s field of view. It also captures some slight ambient noise to create a balanced, realistic audio recording. However, choosing the right shotgun mic can be tricky and confusing at times. Some shotgun mics that are popular choices on the market are Rode NTG 2 and Sennheiser MKE 600. Between the two, Sennheiser MKE 600 is more expensive while Rode NTG 2 is cheaper. Yet, both are often praised for their excellent levels of performance and quality. Which is the one that you should purchase?

Rode NTG 2 Vs Sennheiser MKE 600

Rode NTG 2
Rode NTG 2 is a shotgun mic that features a rugged metal construction for superior durability. It is quite solid and sturdy. It uses JFET impedance convertor with balanced transformer output, with a 0.50” capsule and a supercardioid polar pattern. It picks up sounds from the front and sides, and rejects sounds coming from 150-degree to the rear. With a frequency response range of 20 Hz – 20 kHz, Rode NTG 2 is actually able to deliver satisfying broadcast-quality sounds. The frequency response is accurate, with decent clarity and brightness. However, you will probably need a good preamp in your mixer, because the output level of Rode NTG 2 is very, very low. That is one weakness of the model.

Rode NTG 2 is also praised for its low equivalent noise level, which is barely 18 dB-A. It is also quite sensitive, allowing it to capture subtle sound details. It features a two-step high-pass filter, which can be set for flat or 80 Hz. This is a handy tool for attenuating low-frequency noise such as wind and breath sounds. Rode NTG 2 requires 48V phantom power, but it can also work with 1.5V AA batteries.

Technical Specs

Rode NTG 2Sennheiser MKE 600
- Frequency response: 20Hz - 20kHz- Frequency response: 40 - 20000 Hz
- Supercardioid- super cardioid
- 13.2 x 2 x 6 inches- 0.8 x 0.8 x 10.2 inches
- 48V phantom power or 1.5V AA battery- Microphone Power Source Voltage (DC) 1.5 V

Sennheiser MKE 600
Sennheiser MKE 600 is a little bit smaller, slimmer, and lighter than Rode NTG 2, so handling it can be quite easier. Even so, it offers a significantly higher output level, making it more reliable and convenient to use without demanding preamp requirements. It also features a lower equivalent noise level, so it is actually clearer compared to Rode NTG 2. It has a frequency response range of 40 Hz – 20 kHz, with a switchable low-cut filter for minimizing wind noise and breath sounds. Of course, like other shotgun mics, Sennheiser MKE 600 features a pronounced directivity with a supercardioid polar pattern for maximal rejection of side noise. It can work with 48V phantom power and 1.5V/1.2V AA batteries.

Rode NTG 2 Vs Sennheiser MKE 600

- Broadcast sound quality
- Low noise circuitry
- Two step high-pass filter - flat or 80 Hz
- Rugged metal construction
- Pronounced directivity
- Maximal rejection of side noise
- Switchable "Low Cut" filter minimizes wind noise
- Supplied with foam windshield and shock mount

Conclusion
In general, Sennheiser MKE 600 makes the best choice here. Despite the apparently narrower frequency response range, it can actually deliver better audio reproduction with better clarity. The significantly higher output level is also very useful.

Shure SM7B Vs RE20 Comparison

A lot of people often get confused in choosing between Shure SM7B and Electro Voice RE20 as their primary microphone for multiple purposes. These microphones are both available in a similar price range, and they are both heavily popular on the market, each is supported by a decent number of positive reviews and responses. Because both microphones are able to perform excellently under various circumstances, people tend to use them as a ‘dessert mic’, alias a one-for-all mic, something that you can always count on for doing anything. So, between Shure SM7B and Electro Voice RE20, which is the one that you should get?

Shure SM7B Vs RE20

Design
Putting the two models side by side, we can immediately tell that Shure SM7B is quite significantly smaller than Electro Voice RE20. Shure SM7B is also quite lighter than Electro Voice RE20. Well, most people don’t actually hold these mics in their hands in usage – you put the mic on a stand – but these differences can still factor into your consideration. If you ever need to bring your mic in travel, Shure SM7B can be quite easier to be brought along.

Furthermore, Shure SM7B is colored all in black. It has a soft foam grille that also play a significant role as a pop filter, reducing explosive breath sounds and excessive plosives. On the other hand, Electro Voice RE20 is somewhat creamish, light brown in color, with a metallic grille.

(Let us also see this: Shure SM7B Vs AKG C214 Comparison)

Technical Specs

Shure SM7BRE20
- Frequency response: 50Hz-20kHz- Frequency response: 45Hz-18kHz
- Dynamic Microphone- Dynamic cardioid microphone
- 13.5 x 7 x 4.5 inches- 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 inches
- maximum rejection and minimum coloration of off-axis sound- virtually immune to proximity effect

Performance and Output Quality
Even though the two mics are largely considered as multi-purpose mics, they actually have very different tonal characteristics. Indeed, both are dynamic microphones with cardioid polar pattern, which means that they capture sounds from the front while attenuating the sides and the rear. But there are other things that play major roles in the play.

Shure SM7B comes with a frequency response range of 50 Hz – 20 kHz. The frequency response is quite flat in order to deliver a superiorly clean and natural audio reproduction, for both music and speech. It has a built-in pop filter, making it very reliable for close-up recordings, as it can reduce the proximity effect. It even also comes with a detachable windscreen for add-on protection against wind and breath noises. Shure SM7B typically sounds warm and sweet to the ears. You can hardly get plosives with it, and you can actually scream all the way into it and still get acceptably friendly sound levels.

On the other hand, Electro Voice RE20 sounds brighter than Shure SM7B, for sure. It is significantly brighter and less warm. It can also give you excellent clarity. Unlike Shure SM7B, Electro Voice RE20 doesn’t press the sound levels. It is somehow quite more sensitive to sounds. It doesn’t attenuate wind and breath sounds as much, but it is also immune to the proximity effect due to the sophisticated design.

Shure SM7B Vs RE20

- Flat, wide-range frequency response for exceptionally clean and natural reproduction of both music and speech
- Improved rejection of electromagnetic hum, optimized for shielding against broadband interference emitted by computer monitors.-
- Now shipping with the A7WS detachable windscreen, designed to reduce plosive sounds and gives a warmer tone for close-talk vocals
- Classic cardioid polar pattern, uniform with frequency and symmetrical about axis
- Professional-quality dynamic cardioid microphone
- Heavy-duty internal pop filter reduces proximity effects
- Internal element shock mount reduces vibration-induced noise
- Blast and wind filters cover each acoustic opening

Conclusion
For broadcasting, speeches, also weak vocals and instruments, you should pick Electro Voice RE20. You will need the brightness and clarity to capture the sounds well. However, for strong vocals and musical instruments, you will love Shure SM7B! The distinctively smooth and warm sonic reproduction can give such a sweet and pleasant effect.

Rode NTK Vs NT1A Comparison

What are the differences between Rode NTK and Rode NT1A? Which is the model best for my preferences, needs, and requirements? These questions may be what you are having in your head right now. Of course, both of them are condenser microphones that are tailored for vocals. However, they are being priced significantly differently. Rode NT1A is quite considerably more affordable and budget-friendlier than Rode NTK. Below, you can find the comparisons of the two, along with the recommendation about which to purchase. (Take a look: Rode NTK Vs K2)

Rode NTK Vs NT1A

Design
If we try to put the two products next to each other, we may notice that Rode NTK is a little bit bulkier than Rode NT1A. Both are silver with some hint of creamish hue. Weighing 760 grams, Rode NTK is also quite heavier than Rode NT1A, which is barely 326 grams. For the sake of easy and comfortable handling, Rode NT1A may be more pleasant and friendlier to the user. However, there are still a lot of things that factor in usage.

Rode NTK and Rode NT1A both are pressure gradient cardioid condenser microphones. However, they are designed very differently from each other. Rode NTK is significantly heavier because it uses a valve/tube impedance converter with bipolar output buffer. At the contrast, Rode NT1A is tubeless! Rode NT1A utilizes JFET impedance converter with bipolar output buffer. Such configurations greatly affect their output, and we will delve into this further in the next section.

Technical Specs

Rode NTKRode NT1A
- Large 1 inch capsule with gold plated diaphragm- Large 1" (25mm) capsule with gold plated diaphragm
- Internal capsule shock mounting- Internal capsule shock mounting
- Ultra low noise- Ultra low noise, transformerless surface mount circuitry
- Wide dynamic range- Wide dynamic range

Features and Performance
Rode NTK and Rode NT1A have the same frequency response range of 20 Hz – 20 kHz so that they can capture similar low, mid, and high frequencies. However, Rode NTK comes with a higher impedance of 200 ohms, while Rode NT1A’s impedance is 100 ohms. A mic with higher impedance may require more power, but, as the effect, can deliver better sonic accuracy and sound solidity. Rode NTK also has a higher maximum SPL handling than Rode NT1A, which means that it can tolerate louder sounds and perform better in close-up recordings. The NTK can take up to 158 dB SPL at 1kHz, 1% THD into a 1KΩ load, while the NT1A can only take up to 137 dB SPL.

Rode NTK has a very low equivalent noise level, which is only 12 dB-A. However, being a tubeless, transformerless condenser microphone, Rode NT1A boasts an extremely low noise level of barely 5 dB-A. Indeed, Rode NT1A produces such an unbelievably quiet recording, but Rode NTK is already considered superior compared to many other microphones.

Furthermore, being tubeless, Rode NT1A may sound way too bright to some people. It may sound too raw and too harsh. On the other hand, Rode NTK is quite warmer and less bright. It sounds sweeter and more pleasant to the ears.

Rode NTK Vs NT1A

- Class A valve circuitry
- Hand-selected and graded 6922 twin-triode valve
- 10 Year warranty on the Rode NT1-A
- Includes a tripod base desk stand, pop shield, shock mount, premium 20' microphone cable, dust cover, and an instructional DVD with recording tips

Conclusion
In general, Rode NTK is the best choice here. The tonal characteristics of being warm and only slightly bright are very useful to vocals. It sounds more pleasant and convenient to the ears. With Rode NT1A, you may need some EQ to smooth the audio reproduction a little bit.